Badger Peace Corps Tips

Are you a student in the Madison area looking for tips that will help bolster your Peace Corps Application or improve your chances?

Check out the following! These articles have been curated for UW students and alumni based on common questions received during Advising hours.

Local Opportunities

Don’t know where to start? Check out the Diversity Inventory.

The Diversity Inventory (DI) is a searchable online database of diversity and inclusion programs, events, research, support services, and assessment on campus and in the Madison community. This centralized directory collects and reports diversity data, ultimately affecting change by connecting students, faculty, and staff to initiatives that are creating a more inclusive campus community.

Practicing English And Cultural Exchange (PEACE) is a free, non-credit English conversation and cultural exchange class facilitated by staff members of International Student Services (ISS). The class is open to the full UW-Madison international community: international students, scholars, employees, and their dependents. U.S. American students are also welcome to join our sessions. PEACE focuses on intercultural sharing and learning, cultural adjustment support, and community-building through English conversation practice. We will also have conversations focused on social justice within the U.S. and countries around the word. This fall, PEACE classes will be held online via Blackboard Collaborate. No registration is necessary to participate in the class.
Join us every other Thursday evening 6-7:30 PM and give PEACE a chance! Beginning September 17th.

The Center for Pre-Health Advising gives great ideas here for how to stay productive and involved during the pandemic.

“Even as physical distancing and public health remain of utmost importance, there are an increasing number of opportunities to support your communities safely as we all continue to protect the health of people who are most vulnerable to COVID-19. Many are sharing resources. The Morgridge Center has excellent ideasIdealist gives a great overview. And we offer a number of additional (and overlapping) resources and ideas in the menu below. There are many ways to use time well during this time. In addition to looking for ways to be involved through volunteering, internships, and paid work, we encourage you to take time to learn, reflect, grow, and connect with people (including health professionals) in other ways as well.”

Literacy Network Internships

The Literacy Network is recruiting Session Leaders!

Do you have or want to add to your teaching or tutoring experience? Literacy Network is looking for college students, retirees, or professionals for our Session Leader internships! Being a Session Leader intern is a great professional development opportunity if you are interested in supporting adult learners in our community.

Interning as a Session Leader can help you:

· sharpen instructive, managerial, and communication skills

· get better acquainted with issues affecting adults with low literacy

· become better equipped for careers that have educational or international reach

· become a better teacher, healthcare provider, business executive, or community leader

Training and ongoing support throughout the semester is provided. All instruction is in English. Successful Session Leaders in this internship receive $600 per semester.

Students in our programs are Madison-area adults living in poverty who struggle with rudimentary reading, writing, spoken English, or basic computer skills, like sending an email or using the internet. When they improve those skills, they can find jobs, better support their families, stay healthy, and be more involved in their children’s education. Many are immigrants and refugees, and the adults in our ESL programs come from over 70 different countries and speak over a hundred languages.

Learn more and apply today!

· ABE Session Leader – Help local adults improve their reading, writing, and computer skills, or achieve their high school equivalency. Apply here: https://www.litnetwork.org/job/essential-literacy-internship/

· ESL Session Leader – Help local immigrants/refugees learn English. Apply here: https://www.litnetwork.org/job/esl-program-internship/

Interested in getting involved but don’t have 10hrs/week? Join us as a tutor for 2hrs/week! Learn more at https://www.litnetwork.org/volunteer/.

During the pandemic, our Session Leader interns and volunteer tutors are doing an amazing job keeping our students safe and well-informed while students continue improving their English skills to become more independent. Come join us in this very important work! If you have questions, contact Leanne Chan at leanne@litnetwork.org

Social Justice Internships 2020-2021

Apply now! The application deadline continues until positions are filled. Pay is $13/hour. 10-12 hours/week with a flexible schedule.

Seeking undergraduate and graduate students who are passionate about advancing social justice issues. Social justice internships provide purposeful out-of-classroom experiences within the Office of Inclusion Education to develop skills to engage in social justice  and an opportunity to improve the quality of life for all.

Visit the Social Justice Hub’s website to explore this and many other opportunities.

And, if you are interested in more ways to get involved with the Social Justice Hub, you can express your specific interests here. They will then follow-up with you to discuss getting connected. Open to students, staff and faculty. There are many opportunities available to get involved as a member and they encourage interested students to initiate new projects as well.

Check out some other Social Justice Hub opportunities:

Badger Micro-Internships

Click here to learn about how UW-Madison students of all majors can build skills and experience through these short-term assignments with a variety of employers.

Here’s a quick summary of what exactly micro-internships are:

Micro-Internships are short-term, paid, professional assignments that are similar to those given to new hires or interns. These projects enable Career Launchers to demonstrate skills, explore career paths, and build their networks as they seek the right full-time role. Unlike traditional internships, Micro-Internships can take place year-round, typically range from 5 to 40 hours of work, and are due between one week and one month after kick-off. Micro-Internships are used by companies ranging from those in the Fortune 100 to emerging start-ups, and go across departments including sales, marketing, technology, HR, and finance.

Micro-Internships are facilitated via the Parker Dewey platform, which connects Career Launchers with Companies in need of support.

SuccessWorks Resources

Here are some resources SuccessWorks has developed that students may need access to under the current situation:

Also, regardless of whether you are a first year, or fourth, you should definitely take a couple seconds to enroll in this Canvas Module by SuccessWorks that guides you through whether graduate school is a good option for you, whether you should consider a gap year (or two!), and what options are available to you. It includes a portion called “Have you considered Peace Corps?” that provides great basic information for those who don’t have their post-graduation plan fully nailed down yet.

UW BASES Program

Want to work with children, learn about homelessness, and make a difference in the life of a young student? Join the BASES program! Our undergraduate and graduate mentors are matched with early elementary school kids experiencing homelessness and provide in-school support to a child for a full academic year.

BASES has both class and service learning components. Students are prepared for this experience in a biweekly class that focuses on the potential of 1-on-1 mentoring relationships to aid young children’s adjustment to school and how to foster resilience both in and outside of school. Mentors will learn about the effects of poverty and trauma on child development through guest lectures, films, readings, reflective writing assignments, and discussions. Class exercises are designed to support students’ learning about homelessness, mentoring, societal forces, racial inequities, and emotionally responsive teaching.

The need in our city is enormous. Last year almost 1500 students in Madison Metropolitan School District were identified as highly transient or homeless. Applications are being accepted for the 2020–2021 mentor cohort. You can apply online now:

https://forms.gle/1rkNjKoR68FERKGq5

Please refer any questions to bases@education.wisc.edu.

Wisconsin Intensive Summer Language Institutes

Gain two semesters of language learning in just 8 weeks!

Online learning for summers.

Instruction in less commonly taught languages:

Arabic, Bengali, Brazilian Portuguese, Burmese, Dari, Filipino, Hindi, Hmong, Indonesian, Javanese, Kazakh, Khmer, Lao, Marathi, Persian, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Sinhala, Tajik, Tamil, Thai, Tibetan, Turkish, Urdu, Uyghur, Uzbek, and Vietnamese

Visit the WISLI website for information on language offerings and to learn about programming, deadlines, application criteria, and more!

Food Bank Opportunities

From Molly McCormick, American Red Cross – SW Chapter

Second Harvest Food bank of Southern Wisconsin – 2802 Dairy Drive Madison, WI 53718

Feed My People – 2610 Alpine Rd. Eau Claire, WI 54703

Point of Contact: Stephanie Jung Dorfman, (608) 906-4517 or sdorfman@feedingwi.org

Feeding America Eastern WI Warehouse Locations:

  • Appleton – 2911 W. Evergreen Drive Appleton, WI 54913
  • Milwaukee – 1700 W. Fond du Lac Avenue Milwaukee, WI 53205
  • Point of Contact: Patti Habeck, (920) 427-5925 or phabeck@feedingamericawi.org

Adam Lemons from Team Rubicon volunteered at the Appleton warehouse location to answer questions or provide some feedback.  You can reach Adam at 585-330-5865 or lemons@teamrubiconusa.org.

Visit Volunteer Wisconsin, where anyone can search for other volunteering opportunities in WI.

Molly McCormick
RPCV Philippines 2015-2017
608-304-2096
molly.mccormick@redcross.org

With more then 17,000 people applying to volunteer for Peace Corps every year, the application is very competitive.

How do you make yourself stand out?

Read these tips below and contact the campus recruiter to craft an application that will catch the placement officer’s attention.

Interview Tips: Behavioral Questions

Check out this article, full of helpful tips curated for any student who has a big interview coming up. In the article, Kirby Livingston, PhD student, dives into how to attack the very popular “behavioral interview question.” This information is great to know for any student who wants to ace their Peace Corps or any job interview.